reEntity Framework Core performance tuning–Part III

time to read 1 min | 166 words

I mentioned in the previous post that I’ll take the opportunity to show of some interesting queries. The application itself is here, and you can see how to UI look in the following screenshot:

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I decided to see what would be the best way to come up with the information we need for this kind of query. Here is what I got.

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This is using a select object style to get a complex projection back from the server. Here are the results:

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As you can see, we are able to get all the data we want, in a format that is well suited to just sending directly to the UI with very little work and with tremendous speed.

More posts in "re" series:

  1. (12 Nov 2019) Document-Level Optimistic Concurrency in MongoDB
  2. (25 Oct 2019) RavenDB. Two years of pain and joy
  3. (19 Aug 2019) The Order of the JSON, AKA–irresponsible assumptions and blind spots
  4. (10 Oct 2017) Entity Framework Core performance tuning–Part III
  5. (09 Oct 2017) Different I/O Access Methods for Linux
  6. (06 Oct 2017) Entity Framework Core performance tuning–Part II
  7. (04 Oct 2017) Entity Framework Core performance tuning–part I
  8. (26 Apr 2017) Writing a Time Series Database from Scratch
  9. (28 Jul 2016) Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
  10. (15 Jun 2016) Why you can't be a good .NET developer
  11. (12 Nov 2013) Why You Should Never Use MongoDB
  12. (21 Aug 2013) How memory mapped files, filesystems and cloud storage works
  13. (15 Apr 2012) Kiip’s MongoDB’s experience
  14. (18 Oct 2010) Diverse.NET
  15. (10 Apr 2010) NoSQL, meh
  16. (30 Sep 2009) Are you smart enough to do without TDD
  17. (17 Aug 2008) MVC Storefront Part 19
  18. (24 Mar 2008) How to create fully encapsulated Domain Models
  19. (21 Feb 2008) Versioning Issues With Abstract Base Classes and Interfaces
  20. (18 Aug 2007) Saving to Blob
  21. (27 Jul 2007) SSIS - 15 Faults Rebuttal
  22. (29 May 2007) The OR/M Smackdown
  23. (06 Mar 2007) IoC and Average Programmers
  24. (19 Sep 2005) DLinq Mapping