Ayende @ Rahien

My name is Oren Eini
Founder of Hibernating Rhinos LTD and RavenDB.
You can reach me by phone or email:


+972 52-548-6969

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Posts: 6,026 | Comments: 44,842

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Design patterns in the test of timeMediator

time to read 1 min | 180 words

The mediator pattern defines an object that encapsulates how a set of objects interact. This pattern is considered to be a behavioral pattern due to the way it can alter the program's running behavior.

More about this pattern can be found here.

Like the Façade pattern, I can absolutely see the logic of wanting to use a mediator. It is supposed to make it easier to work with a set of objects, because it hides their interactions.

In practice, almost all known cases are bad ones. In fact, in most systems that I have seen any association of the name to the actual pattern it is supposed to represent is not very associated at all.

The differences between façade and mediator are minute, and you would think the same advice would apply. However, while you can find a lot of usages of facades (or at least things people would call facades), there are very few real world examples of mediator pattern in use. And almost all of them carry the marks that say: “Just read GoF book, @w$0m3!!!”

Design patterns in the test of timeIterator

time to read 1 min | 108 words

In object-oriented programming, the iterator pattern is a design pattern in which an iterator is used to traverse a container and access the container's elements. The iterator pattern decouples algorithms from containers; in some cases, algorithms are necessarily container-specific and thus cannot be decoupled.

More about this pattern.

It is really hard to think about any other pattern that has been more successful. In particular, patterns have long been about overcoming shortcoming of the language or platform.

In this case, iterators has became part of both language and platform in most modern systems.

  • System.Collection.IEnumerable
  • java.util.Iterator
  • Python’s __iter__()

Basically, it is so good, it is everywhere.

Design patterns in the test of timeInterpreter

time to read 2 min | 318 words

In computer programming, the interpreter pattern is a design pattern that specifies how to evaluate sentences in a language. The basic idea is to have a class for each symbol (terminal or nonterminal) in a specialized computer language. The syntax tree of a sentence in the language is an instance of the composite pattern and is used to evaluate (interpret) the sentence.

More about this pattern.

Along with the visitor pattern, this is still a very useful pattern, but in a very small but important context. Parsing and executing code. We see those quite often. In particular, JavaScript is probably the most common place where we see interpreters.

That said, unless you are actually dealing with executing code, there is very little reason for you to want to apply this pattern. In fact, I have seem people go for that several times for purposes that I really can’t explain.

Interpreter is for code execution. It has some interesting differences from compiling the code. For one, it is a lot easier to write, and for the most part, performance is great. This is especially true because the hard parts (the text parsing) are usually done up front and then you are just executing the AST.

From my perspective, we use Jint, a JS interpreter in RavenDB because compiling to IL and running that was complex. Any bugs there was complex to figure out, and most important from our point of view, we really needed to be able to place limits on what you could do. The number of steps that can be taken, the recursion depth, and so on. Doing so with compiled code requires you to have kernel level access, or doing things like Thread Abort.

So Interpreters are good, but watch out when you use it, if it ain’t code that you are going to run, why are you writing this in the first place?

Design patterns in the test of timeCommand, Redux

time to read 6 min | 1001 words

In my previous post about the command pattern, I gushed about how much I loved it. That doesn’t mean that the command pattern as originally envisioned is still completely in fashion.

In particular, the notion of “Undo” was  one of the major features in the command pattern’s cap. Today, that is almost never the case. Sure, if you are building an application such as an editor. Something like Photoshop or a text editor would find the notion of commands with the ability to have an undo stack very compelling. Other than that, however, that is a very rare need.

In most business scenarios, there really is no good way to undo things. How would you implement SendEmailCommand.Undo(), for example? But even something like PlaceOrder.Undo() is a lot more complex and hard to do than you would think. The mere notion of undoing the operation assumes that this isn’t going to have any side affects. But cancelling an order may result in cancellation fees, require you to ship back things you got back, end. It is not “Undoing PlaceOrder”, rather that is a whole different and distinct business process, usually represented by another command: CancelOrder.

Another common issue that people have is the degeneration of the entire architecture to something like:

CommandExecuter.Execute(Command cmd);

To that I answer, more power to you! I love code that is composed of a lot of small classes all doing things about the same way. There is no easier way to look at a system, and that allows you to quite easily add additional functionality to the system easily. That said, mind how you handle routing in that scenario. I have seen people go into the “when a request comes to this URL, let us invoke the following commands” in XML. One of the reasons that people dislike this approach is how you actually call this. If just getting to the command executer is hard and involved, you lose a lot of the advantages.

This popped up in the mailing list, and I really dislike it. The notion of Composite Command. A command that can execute multiple commands. Now, from a programming point of view, I can easily see why you would want to do that. The PlaceOrderCommand operation is composed of a lot of smaller commands. But, and this is important, the notion of Composite Commands basically mean that you get the same thing as the PlaceOrderCommand, but you just lost the name. And naming is important. Almost as important, error handling is quite different between different business scenarios, and you sometimes end up with something like:

   1: var placeOrderCommand = new CompositeCommand(
   2:    new RegisterOrderCommand(),
   3:    new ReserveStockCommand(),
   4:    new ChargeCardCommand(),
   5:    new ShipOrderCommand()
   6: )
   7: {
   8:    Sequential = true,
   9:    StopOnError = true
  10: }

And this is simple, how do you handle an error in the ShipOrderCommand after you already charged the card, for example?

Design patterns in the test of timeCommand

time to read 2 min | 284 words

The command pattern is a behavioral design pattern in which an object is used to represent and encapsulate all the information needed to call a method at a later time.

More about this pattern.

I adore this pattern. If this pattern had a paypal account, I would donate it money on a regular basis.

In general, the notion of encapsulating the method call into an object (like the functor sin C++) is an incredibly powerful idea, because is separate the idea of selecting what to invoke and when to invoke it. Commands are used pretty much every where, WPF is probably the most obvious place, because it actually have the notion of Command as a base class that you are supposed to be using.

Other variations, like encapsulating a bunch of code to be executed later (job / task), or just being able to isolate a complex behavior into its own object, is also very useful. I base quite a lot of my architectural advice on the notion that you can decompose a system to a series of commands that you can compose and shuffle at will.

Recommendation: Use it. Often. In fact, if you go so far as to say that the only reason we have classes is to have a nice vehicle for creating commands, you wouldn’t be going far enough.

Okay, I am kidding, but I really like this pattern, and it is a useful one quite often. The thing that you want to watch for are commands that are too granular. IncrementAgeCommand that is basically wrapping Age++ is probably too much, for example. Commands are supposed to be doing something meaningful from the scope of the entire application.

Design patterns in the test of timeChain of responsibility

time to read 2 min | 344 words

The chain-of-responsibility pattern is a design pattern consisting of a source of command objects and a series of processing objects. Each processing object contains logic that defines the types of command objects that it can handle; the rest are passed to the next processing object in the chain. A mechanism also exists for adding new processing objects to the end of this chain.

More about this pattern.

It is actually quite common to see this pattern now-a-days using events. Something like CancelEventArgs and a CancelEventHandler to handle the FormClosing event of a Form.

We use Chain of Responsibility in RavenDB in several places, like this one:

foreach (var requestResponderLazy in currentDatabase.Value.RequestResponders)
  var requestResponder = requestResponderLazy.Value;
  if (requestResponder.WillRespond(ctx))
    var sp = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    ctx.Response.AddHeader("Temp-Request-Time", sp.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString("#,# ms", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture));
    return requestResponder.IsUserInterfaceRequest;

Note that we have moved on the the behavioral patterns, and those tend to have withstand the test of time much better, in general.

Other places where Chain of Responsibility is used is request routing and error handling. A common approach is to also have this done by delegating, where I am handling what I can and passing on to the next object if I don’t know how to handle a request.

Recommendation: This is still a very useful pattern. One thing to note is that it is effectively an O(N) operation with respect to the number of items in the chain that you have. As usual, do not overuse, but it is a really nice pattern.

Design patterns in the test of timeProxy

time to read 2 min | 287 words

A proxy, in its most general form, is a class functioning as an interface to something else. The proxy could interface to anything: a network connection, a large object in memory, a file, or some other resource that is expensive or impossible to duplicate.

More about this pattern.

Proxies are just about everywhere. Whenever you use NHibernate, WCF or Remoting – you are using proxies. In fact, proxies are such a success that they are literally baked into both the language and the platform. In .NET we have TransparentProxy and in Java has java.lang.reflect.Proxy.

At any rate, proxies are really useful, especially when you think about dynamic proxies. I am far less fond of static proxies, although we use them as well. Dynamic proxies are quite useful to add behavior, especially cross cutting behavior, at very little cost.

That said, one of the major issues that arises from using proxies is an inherit assumptions that the proxy is the same as its target. Commonly you see this happening with remote proxies, where it isn’t obvious that actually making the call is expensive as hell.

Proxies also tend to be used mostly for the infrastructure of your application, rather than for actual application code. In particular, business logic, rather than cross cutting concerns, is really hard to figure out / debug when you have it spread around in proxies.

Recommendation: Use it for infrastructure or cross cutting concerns. Try doing so using dynamic proxies, rather than by generating proxies by hand. Avoid putting business logic there and be aware that by using proxies you are hiding what is going on (that is pretty much the point), so doing non obvious things should be avoided.

Design patterns in the test of timeFlyweight

time to read 2 min | 349 words

A flyweight is an object that minimizes memory use by sharing as much data as possible with other similar objects; it is a way to use objects in large numbers when a simple repeated representation would use an unacceptable amount of memory.

More about this pattern.

On the face of it, this patterns looks very much like something from the old ages. And indeed, most implementations of Flyweight are actually focused deeply on low memory conditions. I would actually argue that you need to consider very carefully when you want to do that.

That said, it is actually used fairly often in high performance places. In the .NET framework, the notion of string interning is one way to get flywieghts (although the problem is that you need to start with a string to get the intern string sort of mess things up). In both the profilers and in RavenDB, we have used variations on the Flyweight pattern.

In the profiler, we are mostly dealing with parsing data from the profiled system, and that means doing a lot of reading from a stream and creating objects. That created an unacceptable memory pressure on the system. We implemented a fairly complex system where we can read from the stream into a buffer, then get or create the string from it. We contributed the implementation back to the Protocol Buffers project. You can see the code here.

In RavenDB, we deal a lot with documents, and many times we find it useful to be caching a document. The problem with doing that is that you need to return something from the cache, which means that you have to return something mutable. Instead of copying all of the data all the time, the internal RavenDB data structures supports copy-on-write semantics, which means that we can easily create clones at basically no cost.

Recommendation: If you are in a perf optimization mode, and you worry about memory pressure, consider using this. Otherwise, like all optimizations, it should be left alone until you have profiler results that says you should consider this.

Midbook pattern crisis: Do NOT reach for that pattern

time to read 4 min | 791 words

From a question in the mailing list:

How do you do to "rollback" an entity state supposing the following scenario.

public JsonResult Reschedule(string id, DateTime anotherDate)
                var dinner = session.Load<Dinner>(id);

                return Json(new { Message = "Bon apetit!" });
            catch (DinnerConcurrencyException ex) 
                return Json(new { Message = ex.Message });

// Base controller
protected void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext) 
      if(filterContext.Exception != null)

The problem that I have is when the schedulerService throws a DinnerConcurrencyException, it is catched at the controller.

After all, the OnActionExecuted will call SaveChanges and persist the dinner with an invalid state.

The next post was:

I have already tried to use Memento Pattern like this:

    var dinner = session.Load<Dinner>(id);

    return Json(new { Message = "Bon apetit!" });
catch (DinnerConcurrencyException ex) 
    dinner = dinner.RestoreState();
    return Json(new { Message = ex.Message });

But didn't work, beacuse I think Raven has proxied my dinner instance.

And here is the Memento implementation:

public abstract class Entity
    MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream();

    public void SaveState()
        new BinaryFormatter().Serialize(stream, this);

    public T RestoreState<T>()
        stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        object o = new BinaryFormatter().Deserialize(stream);

        return (T)o;

You might notice that this create a new instance when you call RestoreState, and that has no impact whatsoever on the actual instance that is managed by RavenDB.

The suggested solution?

catch (DinnerConcurrencyException ex) 
    SkipCallingSaveChanges = true;
    return Json(new { Message = ex.Message });

No need for patterns here.

Midbook patterns crisis: Façade is and ain’t

time to read 2 min | 281 words

I decided to comment to some of the comments in the blog in a full blown post, because they are quite important.

  • View Model is not a façade. It doesn’t allow any operation, and it doesn’t simplify things. It merely give you an easy access to aggregate information.
  • No, every class is not a Façade. I don’t care if “it provides simplified interface to a larger body of code”. If everything is a façade, then façade is meaningless.
  • No, Web Request is no a façade. Sure, it hides a lot of details about TCP, but that isn’t its point. Web Request implements HTTP spec, and that isn’t a façade at all.
  • Web Client / Tcp Client / Tcp Listener are facades – they drastically simplify how to work with sockets. Good facades, too, because when you need to do more, they don’t block you.
  • NHibernate ain’t a façade – it hides ADO.NET, sure, but it also does a lot more then just that.

The whole point of this series of posts was not to talk about patterns. If you want to do that, go ahead and read the books. My attempt is to go and talk about how the patterns are actually used. In practice, in real code.

Sure, in the real world, patterns aren’t used as per their text book definition. That doesn’t mean that we should look at the text book definition. That means that we need to look at how they are actually used! I am not writing a series of posts talking about the problems in the patterns, and that is important. I am writing about the problems in how people use them.


No future posts left, oh my!


  1. Technical observations from my wife (3):
    13 Nov 2015 - Production issues
  2. Production postmortem (13):
    13 Nov 2015 - The case of the “it is slow on that machine (only)”
  3. Speaking (5):
    09 Nov 2015 - Community talk in Kiev, Ukraine–What does it take to be a good developer
  4. Find the bug (5):
    11 Sep 2015 - The concurrent memory buster
  5. Buffer allocation strategies (3):
    09 Sep 2015 - Bad usage patterns
View all series


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