Data modeling with indexesBusiness rules

time to read 4 min | 613 words

imageIn my last post on the topic, I showed how we can define a simple computation during the indexing process. That was easy enough, for sure, but it turns out that there are quite a few use cases for this feature that go quite far from what you would expect. For example, we can use this feature as part of defining and working with business rules in our domain.

For example, let’s say that we have some logic that determine whatever a product is offered with a warranty (and for how long that warranty is valid). This is an important piece of information, obviously, but it is the kind of thing that changes on a fairly regular basis. For example, consider the following feature description:

As a user, I want to be able to see the offered warranty on the products, as well as to filter searches based on the warranty status.

Warranty rules are:

  • For new products made in house, full warranty for 24 months.
  • For new products from 3rd parties, parts only warranty for 6 months.
  • Refurbished products by us, full warranty, for half of new warranty duration.
  • Refurbished 3rd parties products, parts only warranty, 3 months.
  • Used products, parts only, 1 month.

Just from reading the description, you can see that this is a business rule, which means that it is subject to many changes over time. We can obviously create a couple of fields on the document to hold the warranty information, but that means that whenever the warranty rules change, we’ll have to go through all of them again. We’ll also need to ensure that any business logic that touches the document will re-run the logic to apply the warranty computation (to be fair, these sort of things are usually done as a subscription in RavenDB, which alleviate that need).

Without further ado, here is the index to implement the logic above:

You can now query over the warranty types and it’s duration, project them from the index, etc. Whenever a document is updates, we’ll re-compute the warranty status and update the index.

This saves you from having additional fields in your model and greatly diminish the cost of queries that need to filter on warranty or its duration (since you don’t need to do this computation during the query, only once, during indexing).

If the business rule definition changes, you can update the index definition and RavenDB will effectively roll out your change to the entire dataset. That is nice, but even though I’m writing about cool RavenDB features, there are some words of cautions that I want to mention.

Putting queryable business rules in the database can greatly ease your life, but be wary of putting too much business logic in there. In general, you want your business logic to reside right next to the rest of your application code, not running in a different server in a mode that is much harder to debug, version and diagnose. And if the level of complexity involved in the business rule exceed some level (hard to define, but easy to know when you hit it), you should probably move from defining the business rules in an index to a subscription.

A RavenDB subscription allow you to get all changes to documents and apply your own logic in response. This is a reliable way to process data in RavenDB, this runs in your own code, under your own terms, so it can enjoy all the usual benefits of… well, being your code, and not mine. You can read more about them in this post and of course, the documentation.

More posts in "Data modeling with indexes" series:

  1. (14 Jan 2019) Predicting the future
  2. (10 Jan 2019) Business rules
  3. (08 Jan 2019) Introduction