Ayende @ Rahien

My name is Oren Eini
Founder of Hibernating Rhinos LTD and RavenDB.
You can reach me by phone or email:


+972 52-548-6969

, @ Q c

Posts: 6,026 | Comments: 44,842

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A visual look at RavenDB velocity

time to read 1 min | 172 words

We recently added a very small feature to our build server, generating tags on the repository for every successful build. This has the surprising effect of giving us a really nice way of looking into something that I always wanted, the rate of change across pushes to production.

The way we work in Hibernating Rhinos, every single push to the remote repository is a viable product, and it becomes a a publicly available build. The problem is that in git there isn’t really a way to track pushes, so it was quite hard to figure out after the fact the scope of change of each build without looking at the individual commits.

With the new tags, we have a much easier time. I mean, just take a look:


You can see pretty rapid velocity here, with new goodies that come abroad.



I see no commits for 6/25/2011. What a bunch of slackers!


There's quite a lot of time between build 392 and 393, what kind of build rules do you use? Not per commit apparently, but is there a special reason for that?

Ayende Rahien

Roy, We have a build per push, commits are local to each dev env, push are globally visible.


Ah, of course. That makes sense. Having a tag like this will also make the version number a lot more friendly to the end user, compared to showing the short commit hash.


Completely irrelevant, but the check-in comments are interesting -- is it a cultural or technical background thing that makes some people comment in the past tense (Fixed, added, etc) vs the current tense?

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