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RavenDB session management in ASP.Net Web API

This was brought up in the mailing list, and I thought it was an interesting solution, therefor, this post.

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A couple of things to note here. I would actually rather use the Initialize() / Dispose() methods for this, but the problem is that we don’t really have a way at the Dispose() to know if the action threw an exception. Hence, the need to capture the ExecuteAsync() operation.

For fun, you can also use the async session as well, which will integrate very nicely into the async nature of most of the Web API.

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Posted By: Ayende Rahien

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Comments

Tugberk
03/14/2012 08:24 AM by
Tugberk

Just curious, I am fairly new to RavenDb and so far, I have seen that mocking is not the way we test along with RavenDb.

But in above case, don't we direct dependency on DocumentStore? For an ASP.NET Web API application which has unit testing in mind, what would you recommend?

Ayende Rahien
03/14/2012 08:32 AM by
Ayende Rahien

Tugberk, RavenDB can run in pure in memory mode, perfect for unit testing.

ashic
03/14/2012 10:36 AM by
ashic

Had a similar question in mind - do you recommend firing up an in memory raven db per unit test or fire one up and use for a batch of tests. Is there any performance issue in firing up an in memory store (since using a fresh one per test would be purer).

Ayende Rahien
03/14/2012 11:02 AM by
Ayende Rahien

Ashic, We use one in memory store per test.

Ryan Riley
03/14/2012 06:54 PM by
Ryan Riley

Why not create a DelegatingHandler and push that into your configuration? You can push the session object into HttpRequestMessage.Items. Was there a reason you chose to subclass ApiController instead?

Ayende Rahien
03/14/2012 10:17 PM by
Ayende Rahien

Ryan, It was the most obvious thing to do, this is similar to how I handle things in ASP.Net MVC

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